Monday, February 15, 2010

A Road Awakening


You non-cyclocrossing, five wide riding, "hold your line" yelling, red light blowing, king of the group ride Lance-wannabes are next. r5 is your redneck in the F150 horns blaring sandbagger caller outer.

8 comments:

  1. Once again, I submit to you Ryan Halloran! He's a step above Sandbagger, he's a Grandbagger. A Cat3 since at least 2004 as that's as far back as USA Cycling lists his results.

    Ryan Grandbagger Halloran

    Damn you S.C.!! I wanted to be the first asshole of the day!

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  2. I love it when the bikers are on narrow twisty shoulder-less roads with heavy trees creating nothing but blind spots making passing these db's almost impossible.

    I do it anyways, but if another car pops up in front of me, a biker is going to end up in the ditch. Then I'll stop, and if there's so much as a scratch on my car, I'm taking the guys bike and leaving him in the ditch.

    Seriously, there's a large number of roadie db's out there who need to learn how to choose a proper route for riding, not every road is appropriate to be going 15-20mph on.

    As for the rest of you roadies, ride on!

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  3. First of all, we should realize that death is truly part of life and that it is neither would not bad in itself. In the Tibetan book of the dead, it says “what we called death is merely a concept.” In other words, death represents the end of the gross consciousness and its support, the gross body. This happens at the gross level of the mind. But neither death nor birth exist at the subtle level of consciousness that we call “clear light. ”

    Of course, generally speaking, death is something we dread. However, death, which we want nothing to do with, is unavoidable. This is why it is important that during our lifetime we become familiar with the idea of death, so that it will not be a real shock to us at the moment it comes. We do not meditate regularly on death in order to die more quickly; on the contrary, like everyone, we wish to live a long time. However, since death is inevitable, we believe that if we begin to prepare for it and an earlier point in time, on the day of our death it will be easier to accept it.

    I think that there is no general rule with regard to the intensive care often given to patients in order to prolong their lives. It is a complex problem, and in examining it we must take numerous elements into account, according to each set of circumstances, each particular case. For example, if we prolong the life of person who is critically ill but whose mind remains very lucid, we are giving him or her the opportunity to continue to think in the way only a human being can think. We must also consider whether the person will benefit from prolonged life or whether, on the contrary, he will experience great physical and mental suffering, physical pain, or extreme fear. If the person is in a deep coma, that is yet another problem. The wishes of the patient’s family must also be taken into account, as well as the immense financial problems that prolonged care can create. I think the most important thing is to try and to our best to ensure that dying person may depart quietly, with serenity and in a peace. There is also a distinction to be made between those dying people who practice a religion and those who do not. Whatever the case, whether one is religious or not, I believe it is better to die in peace.

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  4. LEVITICUS 24:16 “And whoever blasphemes the name of the Lord shall surely be put to death, and all the congregation shall certainly stone him.”

    Wow, if everyone on earth who, in a momentary fit of anger, used a blasphemous word, was put to death by their congregation, our churches would be mostly empty. Surely this is not the law of a loving and forgiving God!!!

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  5. .....vice and virtue can not be explained in terms of conformity and unconformity to reason, as the classical tradition claimed. Reason, in fact, is an inactive principle in itself and is not responsible for final ends. On the other hand, through reason, men can discover what is true and false and not what is right and wrong. Therefore, the distinction between moral good and evil cannot be made by reason. Morality is not susceptible of demonstration, as it depends on men's perceptions and appetites, that are subjective. What distinguishes a virtue from a vice is the impression that it generates. If the impression is agreeable, then it will be virtue; if it is uneasy, then it will be a vice. It follows that there is no room for eternal and immutable standards in morality.

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  6. ESTRAGON:
    (giving up again). Nothing to be done.
    VLADIMIR:
    (advancing with short, stiff strides, legs wide apart). I'm beginning to come round to that opinion. All my life I've tried to put it from me, saying Vladimir, be reasonable, you haven't yet tried everything. And I resumed the struggle. (He broods, musing on the struggle. Turning to Estragon.) So there you are again.
    ESTRAGON:
    Am I?
    VLADIMIR:
    I'm glad to see you back. I thought you were gone forever.
    ESTRAGON:
    Me too.
    VLADIMIR:
    Together again at last! We'll have to celebrate this. But how? (He reflects.) Get up till I embrace you.
    ESTRAGON:
    (irritably). Not now, not now.
    VLADIMIR:
    (hurt, coldly). May one inquire where His Highness spent the night?
    ESTRAGON:
    In a ditch.
    VLADIMIR:
    (admiringly). A ditch! Where?
    ESTRAGON:
    (without gesture). Over there.
    VLADIMIR:
    And they didn't beat you?
    ESTRAGON:
    Beat me? Certainly they beat me.
    VLADIMIR:
    The same lot as usual?
    ESTRAGON:
    The same? I don't know.

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  7. Save it for the classroom, Collegeboy!

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